1.3 Rate Study Process This section details the development of the Town’s water and wastewater rates via the Proposition 218 Proposition 218 Guide for Special Districts 3 On November 5, 1996, California voters approved Proposition 218, the so-called “Right to Vote on Taxes Act.” Proposition 218 amended the California Constitution by adding articles XIII C (“Article XIII C”) and XIII D (“Article XIII D”), which affect the ability of special districts and other It is a tool that can be used to protest water and sewer rate increases. What is Proposition 218? It applies to governmental entities, including special districts, such as public water … Moulton Niguel Water District, Water Budget Based Rate Structure (2018) Rancho California Water District 2017 Water, Recycled Water, and Wastewater Rate Study Report (June 2017) Proposition 218 Compliance Information. Proposition 218 was approved by the voters of California in November of 1996, and was officially titled the “Right to Vote on Taxes Act”. At oral argument in May, the justices set aside Proposition 218, focusing instead on whether the rate increase qualified as a tax. Proposition 218 does not greatly expand the initiative power. Effect of Rate Adjustments on Average EID Bimonthly Bills On Thursday, May 30, 2019, the California Supreme Court issued its opinion in Plantier v.Ramona Municipal Water District regarding a Proposition 218 (Prop 218) challenge brought by a San Diego County restaurant owner (Owner) against the Ramona Municipal Water District (District) alleging the District’s sewer fee charges are unlawful. (District) for the Treated and Untreated Water Rate Study . Indeed, the California State Treasurer called opponents of Proposition 218 “irresponsible” for their failed effort to make the credit worthiness of existing bonds an issue during the campaign. Their decision Monday put the city’s water rate in the context of Geiger v. Board of Supervisors, where the high court held that a Butte County sales tax ordinance was exempt from referendum. A 2006 court decision clarified that Proposition 218 applies to retail water rates. Proposition 218 ─ Establishes substantive limitations on water service fees and charges In November 1996, California voters approved Proposition 218,3 which amended the California Constitution by, among other things, adding Article XIII D. Article XIII D, section 6 Proposition 218 mailer has been sent to notify you of PROPOSED new rates for water, wastewater, and recycled water services, as required by Article XIII D, Section 6, of the California Constitution (Proposition 218). Proposition 218, which amended the California Constitution, imposes substantive and procedural requirements on local agencies by limiting property-related fees, including retail water rates. Since that time, the Long Beach Water Department has complied with Proposition 218 when setting water and sewer rates. This power historically was intended to apply to the repeal of taxes. See, Rossi v. Association of California Water Agencies (ACWA), Proposition 218: Local Agency Guidelines for Compliance (2007) This report presents the analyses, rationales, and methodologies utilized in the study to determine cost of service-based water rates that meet the requirements of California Constitution Article XIII D, Section 6 (commonly referred to as “Proposition 218”). Proposition 218, provided the charges do not exceed the cost of providing service and are adopted pursuant to the procedural requirements of Proposition 218. Proposition 218, known as Prop 218, is an article of the California Consitution, Article XIIID.